Hill-Rom® Clinical Resource Center

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Hill-Rom® Clinical Resource Center

Supporting Evidence

Featured Items

At the heart of best practices in health care are well-informed decisions based on best-available evidence.

The Clinical Resource Library is a powerful support tool designed to provide busy healthcare professionals with current evidence, education, and tools so that they can make informed decisions and implement best practices on behalf of their patients and facilities.

Take a look around and you'll find a repository of the best publications, relevant education, and helpful toolkits and resources. The Hill-Rom Clinical Resource Library is a searchable database including key references and resources related to Hill-Rom's products and clinical programs.

  • Progressive Mobility in the Critically Ill
    Fitzpatrick MA, et al. | Critical Care Nurse | 2010
  • An Environmental Scan for Early Mobilization Practices in U.S. ICUs
    Bakhru RN, et al. | Critical Care Medicine | 2015

    This article discusses the findings of a survey concerning early mobilization practices and infrastructure in ICUs within the United States. The authors found that only 30% of US ICUs have a written early mobilization protocol. The authors also found that common barriers to mobilization include safety concerns, staffing levels, and competing priorities. They conclude that written early mobility protocols are uncommon, infrastructure is limited, and regional differences exist.

  • Financial Implications of a Hospital Early Mobility Program
    Bognar K, et al. | ESICM | 2015

    Significant evidence has shown that early mobility programs improve clinical outcomes for patients in critical care conditions. However, the lack of evidence associated with the financial benefit of early mobility programs has served as a barrier to program implementation. This study evaluates the financial benefits associated with the clinical outcomes of early mobility programs in the ICU environment. The study concludes that early mobility programs can generate annual savings up to $1,250,000 for a capitated delivery system, $925,000 for a Hospital, or $325,000 for a private payer.

  • Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment and Prevention: Comparative Effectiveness
    Chou R, et al. | Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality | 2013

    Pressure ulcers are a relatively common occurrence across all care settings, resulting in significant health burdens. However, risk-assement scales and preventive interventions can decrease the incidence or severity of pressure ulcers. 

  • The Economic Impact of Improved Clinical Outcomes with Increased Mobility in the NeuroIntensive Care Unit
    Hester JM, et al. | 2015

    Early mobility in a neurocritical ICU has shown positive clinical outcomes.  This study examines the sustainability and financial outcomes associated with an early mobility program.  The authors from UF Health-Shands Hospital, were able to maintain improvements in ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), which yielded a 13% reduction in cost of patient care.  The authors have estimated a combined savings of $12.4 million dollars over a two year time period.  They conclude that early mobility programs are able to be implemented and sustained with positive  clinical and financial outcomes.

  • A Survey of International Practices And Infrastructure To Support Early Mobilization
    Bakhru RN, et al. | Intensive Care Medicine | 2014

    This abstract, presented at ESCIM 2014 in Barcelona, Spain summarizes the findings of an international survey concerning early mobilization practices and infrastructure. The authors found that ICU's infrequently have a written early mobilization protocol (20-30% across four researched countries). The authors also found that common barriers to mobilization include safety concerns, staffing levels and competing priorities. They conclue that written early mobility protocols are uncommon, infrastructure is limited and regional differences exist.

  • The Effect of Patient Migration in Bed on Torso Elevation
    Wiggermann N, et al. | Nursing Research | 2015

    Head of bed (HOB) elevation has been shown to reduce incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in mechanically ventilated patients. AACN and ATS recommend HOB elevation of at least 30°. The authors of this study measured the relationship between HOB elevation and actual patient position to determine the impact of patient migration. Using motion capture methods on ten healthy participants in a lab setting, the authors were able to quantitatively determine this relationship with a linear regression. The authors conclude that patient migration results in lower HOB elevations. They further state that clinicians should consider protocols and equipment that minimize patient migration in order to help maintain guidelines recommended HOB  elevations designed to protect patients from VAP.  

  • Effects of a Nonpowered Dynamic Surface on Reducing Facility-Acquired Pressure Ulcers
    Strilko B, et al. | Journal of Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nursing | 2005

    Due to rising costs in specialty bed rentals and increased concern over hospital acquired pressure ulcers, Provena St. Joseph Medical Center's 350-bed hospital opted to purchase new pressure redistribution surfaces for all Med-Surg beds. Replacement of the standard foam mattress to the nonpowed, dynamic AccuMax Quantum™ Surface resulted in a 61.5% decrease in facilty-acquired pressure ulcers over a 8-month time period. 

  • Examining the positive effects, Winkelman, CCN, 2012
    Winkelman C, et al. | Intensive and Critical Care Nursing | 2012

    This prospective study compared clinical outcomes in ICU patients who either received standard care or an intervention comprised of 20 minutes of exercise once daily for 2-7 days. Patients in the intervention group had a significantly decreased length of stay in the ICU.

  • Safety and efficacy, Balas, CCM, poster, 2012
    Balas M | Critical Care Medicine | 2012

    This oral abstract presented at the Critical Care Congress in Jan 2013 reviews UNMC's implementation of the ABCDE bundle. It shows that is is both safe and efficacious. Through use of the ABCDE bundle, UNMC saw a reduction of 3 days per patient on a ventilator, a 9 pt reduction in cases of delirium, and an 11pt reduction in mortality.

  • The effect of increased mobility on morbidity, Titsworth, J Neurosurg, 2012
    Titsworth WL, et al. | J Neurosurg. | 2012

    This article describes a study investigating the effectiveness of increased mobility among neurointensive care unit patients. In this study, a mobility bundle toolkit was utilized, including the Progressive Upright Mobility Protocol (PUMP) algorithm, additional mobility aides were purchased, and interdisciplinary education was initiated. This resulted in increased mobility in neurointensive care unit patients by 300%, reduced LOS in the neurointensive care unit by 13%, significantly decreased hospital LOS (12 days to 8.6 days), decreased hospital-acquired infections by 60%, and significantly decreased ventilator-associated pneumonia from a rate of 2.14 per 1000 days to 0. Increased mobility did not lead to increases in adverse events.

  • Introduction to progressive mobility, Vollman, CCN, 2010
    Vollman K | Crit Care Nurse | 2010

    This article reviews the risks associated with immobility (VAP, vent stay, pressure ulcers, reduced QOL after discharge, functional limitations), defines the process of early mobility, and describes barriers to prioritizing positioning and mobility of patients in the ICU. The safety of mobility protocols is reviewed by discussing a study of 103 ICU patients undergoing mobilization, in which <1% experienced an AE due to early mobilization and 69% could ambulate >100 ft. at ICU discharge.

  • Physiotherapy in ICU, Stiller, A Syst Review, 2013
    Stiller K | CHEST | 2013

    This systematic review articles summarize all papers published from 1999 through 2013 on the topic of physiotherapy in the ICU. It found 85 new articles on the subject, with 26 specifically on the use of early mobility. The findings are clear that early mobility is safe and efficacous, and has human benefits that can reduce ICU and Hospital LOS.

  • Integrating a multi mobility program, Bassett, CCN, 2012
    Bassett RD, et al. | Intensive Crit Care Nurse | 2012

    This article describes an initiative to implement an evidence-based early mobility continuum into current ICU culture in 8 hospitals in the United States. This multicenter initiative included process design, culture work, and education. One hundred thirty patients were evaluated, and the results showed substantial utilization of physical therapy within 24 hours of admission and a reduction in ventilator days (3.0 days pre vs. 2.1 days post; p=0.06).

  • Using care bundles to improve health care quality, Resar, IHI, 2012
    Resar R, et al. | 2012

    This Institute for Healthcare Improvement white paper provides a great overview of what a healthcare bundle is and the historic context for why they were developed. It then discusses why bundles produce better outcomes for patients.

  • Reducing iatrogenic risks: ICU-acquired delirium and weakness crossing the quality chasm, Vasilevskis EE, Chest, Nov 2010
    Vasilevskis EE, et al. | CHEST | 2010

    This article describes strategies for the implementation of a bundle of evidence-based strategies for reducing mortality due to ICU-acquired delirium and weakness: awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring, and exercise/early mobility. Inadequate technology is cited as a barrier to implementation of early mobility therapy.

  • Early physical and occupational therapy in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients: a randomized controlled trial, Schweickert, Lancet, May 2009
    Schweickert, et al. | The Lancet | 2009

    This randomized trial evaluated the impact of physical and occupational therapy on function outcomes in mechanically vented patients in the ICU. Of 104 patients, 59% returned to independent functional status at discharge in the intervention arm compared with 35% in the control arm. Patients in the intervention arm also had shorter duration of delirium (P=0.02) and more ventilator-free days (P=0.05) compared to the control arm. Discontinuation due to patient instability occurred in 4% of all therapy sessions.

  • Early intensive care unit mobility therapy in the treatment of acute respiratory failure, Morris PE, Crit Care Med, Aug 2008
    Morris PE, et al. | Crit Care Med. | 2009

    This prospective cohort study evaluated the impact of implementing a mobility protocol on the proportion of ICU patients receiving physical therapy vs. usual care. Eighty percent of protocol patients received greater than 1 physical therapy session compared to usual care (47%). Protocol patients were out of bed 6 days earlier than SICU patients. ICU stay was improved by 1.4 days (P=0.025), and hospital length of stay was improved by 3.3 days (P=0.006) in protocol patients.

  • Mobilizing patients in the intensive care unit improving neuromuscular weakness and physical function, Needham D, JAMA, Oct 2008
    Needham, D | JAMA | 2008

    This grand rounds presentation and assocaited articles summarizes the challenges patients and hospitals face with immobility, provides the historical background on the matter, and reviews the evidence supporting an early mobility protocol. It then discusses Johns Hopkins experience implementing such a protocol.

  • Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Interprofessional National Standards, Matz, ANA, 2013
    Matz MW, et al. | Amer Nur Assn. | 2013

    This interprofessional national standard from the American Nurses Association reviews the need for safe patient handling and mobility for healthcare reciepients and care providers in terms of safety for all involved. It proposes eight standards that are relevant to those involved regardless of the care setting.

  • Results of the 2008-2009 International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey and a 3-Year, Acute Care, Unit-Specific Analysis
    2009

    This observational study evaluated the prevalence of pressure ulcers in acute care facilities. In 2008 and 2009, overall prevalence was 13.5% and 12.3%, respectively. Facility-acquired prevalence was 6% and 5%, respectively. Overall prevalence was highest in long-term acute care, while facility-acquired prevalence was highest in ICUs. Overall and facility-acquired prevalence were lower in 2008-2009 compared to 2006-2007. However, in 2009 approximately 10% of all ulcers were device related.

  • Results of the 2010 International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey
    2010

    This International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence (IPUP) survey of pressure ulcer prevalence revealed that overall prevalence, facility-acquired prevalence, prevalence excluding stage I, and facility-acquired prevalence excluding stage I have decreased significantly during 2009-2010. An estimated 8% to 10% of patients in ICUs developed a facility-acquired pressure ulcer. Facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence is highest in pediatric ICUs, burn units, ICU, and CCU, and SICU. 

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevalence in Bariatric Patients – Data From the International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey 2009
    2009

    This study of data from the 2009 IPUP survey focused on pressure ulcer prevalence by BMI and weight distribution revealed the following: the percentage of extremely obese patients increased from 18.3% to 20.6% in 2008-2009, 36% of survey patients have a BMI >30, and pressure ulcer prevalence is higher in patients weighing >300 lbs.

  • Early Results of an Assessment of the Incidence and Treatment of Stage II or III Pressure Ulcers of the Hill-Rom P400 Therapy Surface in Home Care and Extended Care
    2009

    This case study of 3 patients in the home care and extended care settings monitor the healing of existing pressure ulcers and the development of new pressure ulcers in patients on the P400 therapy surface. Positive results for healing were seen in all 3 patients

  • 2010 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Survey: Canadian Results
    2011

    This study collected data on pressure ulcer prevalence and risk score, surface type, and other parameters from facility-performed IPUP surveys. Overall pressure ulcer prevalence in the acute care, LTAC, LTC, and rehab settings decreased in 2009-2010. Significant decreases in facility-acquired prevalence were found in all settings except rehab

  • The Demographics of Suspected Deep Tissue Injury in the United States: An Analysis of the International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence Survey 2006-2009
    2010

    This article reports data from the international Pressure Ulcer Prevalence survey 2006-2009 in patients with suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI). Overall and facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence was constant in 2006-2008 and decreased by about 1% in 2009 (P<0.001). The prevalence of pressure ulcers identified as sDTI increased to 9% of all observed ulcers in 2009?a 3-fold increase?while the proportion of stage I and II ulcers has decreased and stage III and IV ulcers remained constant. This increase may be due in part to education of staging definitions. 

  • Pressure Ulcers: Avoidable or Unavoidable? Results of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Conference
    2011

    The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) hosted a conference in 2010 to establish consensus on the avoidability of pressure ulcers. An overall 80% agreement was reached among representatives, with unanimous consensus reached for the following: most PrUs are avoidable; not all PrUs are avoidable; there are situations that render PrU development unavoidable, including hemodynamic instability that is worsened with physical movement and inability to maintain nutrition and hydration status and the presence of an advanced directive prohibiting artificial nutrition/hydration; pressure redistribution surfaces cannot replace turning and repositioning; and if enough pressure was removed from the external body the skin cannot always survive.

  • Saint Thomas Health Services (STHS): Clinical Outcomes; People, Process and Technology – Combining the Best of Each to Improve Clinical and Financial Outcomes
    2011

    This study evaluated the effects of a program converting to Hill-Rom® bed systems on the incidence of adverse events. Overall, the incidence of adverse events was reduced by the following percentages: pressure ulcers (19%), VAP (91.9%), and falls (27.7%). 

  • Safe Skin Video

    This video highlights the clinical and economic need for reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers and the role of heat, moisture, and shear contributed by therapy surfaces on the development, exacerbation, and healing of pressure ulcers

  • Air-Fluidized Therapy in Patients with Suspected Deep Tissue Injury
    2012

    In this case series, 5 patients with 10 sDTI were placed on the Clinitron® Rite Hite® AFT therapy surface within 12 hours of having the sDTI diagnosed and were also treated with standard wound care. Even with optimal treatment, sDTI wounds may rapidly progress to Stage III-IV pressure ulcers. Of the sDTIs identified: 4 healed prior to discharge, 4 evolved into stage II ulcers, and 2 remained classified as sDTI at discharge.

  • Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Progression in Critically Ill Subjects: Influence of Low Air Loss Mattress Versus a Powered Air Pressure Redistribution Mattress
    2012

    This study evaluated the change in existing pressure ulcers and incidence of new pressure ulcers in surgical ICU patients using a new low-air-loss, weight-based, microclimate management (LAL-MCM) system compared to the standard SICU bed with an integrated, powered air pressure redistribution (IP-AR) surface. Incidence of supine pressure ulcers was 0% in the LAL-MCM group and 18% in the IP-AR group (P=0.046), despite more comorbidities in the patients in the LAL-MCM group. 

  • Microclimate Management Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
    2008

    This whitepaper explains the determination of optimal ranges for heat and moisture in order to avoid skin breakdown. 

  • The Effect of Using a Low-Air-Loss Surface on the Skin Integrity of Obese Patients: Results of a Pilot Study
    2009

    This study assesses the impact of a new low-air-loss, continuous lateral rotation therapy bed in 21 obese, bariatric acute care patients. During this pilot study, pressure ulcers decreased in size from an average 5.2 cm2 to 2.6 cm2, and no new pressure ulcers developed. 

  • Air Fluidized Therapy Use in Patients With Suspected Deep Tissue Injury – A Case Series
    2011

    Patients with suspected deep tissue injuries (sDTI) were placed on the Clinitron Rite-Hite bed, treated with standard care, and assessed until resolution of their sDTI. Out of 5 patients and 10 ulcers, 4 healed before discharge, 2 remained at discharge, and 4 became Stage II ulcers. Patients placed on air-fluidized therapy had significantly less skin breakdown than expected. 

  • A Pilot Study of a New Low Air Loss Treatment Surface in the Critical Care Setting
    2008

    This observational study of 30 critical care patients evaluated the impact of a pressure redistribution surface with electronic sensors on existing pressure ulcers. During the study, existing pressure ulcers decreased in volume by an average of 41% and in area by an average of 9%.

  • Eliminating Facility-Acquired Pressure Ulcers at Ascension Health
    2006

    Data were collected on pressure ulcer incidence in 67 acute care facilities using the SKIN bundle. Pressure ulcer incidence decreased from >2% to <1% over a 14-month period, and no new stage III/IV facility-acquired pressure ulcers developed from August 2004 through February 2006. 

  • Treating Severe Pressure Ulcers in the Home Setting: Faster Healing and Lower Cost with Air Fluidized Therapy
    2004

    This article describes how AFT is technologically different from Group 1 (Static devices / mattresses) and Group 2 (dynamic powered and nonpowered mattress replacements and overlays). Using the healing rates described by Ochs, (2004) Cuddigan and Ayello model treatment costs for severe ulcers. They find a net savings of $39, 642 to heal a 49-cm2 stage III/IV ulcer when using AFT compared to Group 2 surfaces. 

  • Financial and Clinical Outcome Review of Clinitron Use to Treat Stage IV Pressure Ulcer
    2008

    This article describes a patient with a Stage IV pressure ulcer who was started on Clinitron therapy. A wound healing rate of 67% was achieved within a month of therapy and 99% after 104 days of Clinitron air-fluidized therapy. An experienced home healthcare clinician expected that a wound of this nature would take 6 months to heal. 

  • Air-Fluidized Therapy: Physical Properties and Clinical Uses
    2010

    This review describes the benefits and drawbacks of air-fluidized therapy compared to other support types in terms of factors known to impact skin breakdown: interface pressure, shear, friction, heat, and moisture. The clinical benefits of air-fluidized therapy include faster pressure ulcer healing, decreased rate of hospitalization and ER visits for long-term care pressure ulcer patients, and decreased mortality and increased comfort for patients with burns and inhalation injury

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention in High-Risk Postoperative Cardiovascular Patients
    2011

    Air-fluidized therapy beds were provided for patients who required vasopressors and mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours postoperatively. While on therapy beds, only 1 of 27 patients developed a stage I ulcer versus 40 ulcers developed in 25 patients prior to therapy bed implementation despite already being a high-risk population for the development of pressure ulcers due to severity of illness.

  • Microclimate Management: So Much More Than Just Airflow
    2008

    This whitepaper discusses factors impacting the skin microclimate and describes the ideal combination of airflow, temperature, and surface material for preventing skin breakdown.

  • Comparison of Air-Fluidized Therapy With Other Support Surfaces Used to Treat Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents
    2005

    This retrospective pressure ulcer prevention and treatment study compared healing rates for different support surfaces in nursing home residents. Support surface types were categorized into 3 groups: static overlays and replacement mattresses (1); low-air-loss beds, alternating pressure, and powered/nonpowered overlays/mattresses (2); and air-fluidized beds (3). Mean healing rates were as follows: 5.2 cm2/wk (Group 3); 1.8 cm2/wk (Group 2); 1.5 cm2/wk (Group 1) (P=0.007 comparing Group 3 to 1 and 2). Mean healing rates were also significantly greater for stage III/IV ulcers on Group 3 surfaces. Groups 1 and 3 had fewer hospitalizations and ER visits compared to Group 2 (P=0.01). 

  • High Pressure Ulcer Risk Patients and Specialty Surface Utilization: Data From the 2010 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Survey
    2011

    This study evaluated current practice trends in surface utilization for patients at high risk for developing pressure ulcers. Surface types used for high-risk patients were powered static air (28%), foam (21.7%), low air loss (16%), self-adjusting technology (8%), alternating pressure (5.2%), nonpowered static air (2.0%), and air-fluidized therapy (1.8%), demonstrating that high-risk patients were most often placed on surfaces that are inferior to specialty surfaces with regard to pressure ulcer development and breakdown. 

  • Evaluation of the Incidence of Pressure Ulcers Using Hill-Rom VersaCare Surfaces
    2011

    This study evaluated the clinical impact of the VersaCare® P500 low-air-loss surface with Advanced Microclimate Management for pressure ulcer prevention in 127 post operative orthopedic surgical patients

  • Identifying Gaps, Barriers, and Solutions in Implementing Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs
    2011

    This project identified 3 major barriers to pressure ulcer prevention program implementation: limitations in staff education and training, poor communication of at-risk status, and insufficient quality improvement evaluation of bedside practices. The study noted insufficient clarity for selecting and securing appropriate therapy surfaces. Guidelines were identified for addressing these barriers. 

  • The Path to Excellence: How One Facility Received and Maintained a CMS 5 Star Rating
    2010

    This whitepaper describes surveillance and documentation processes for quality measure, including facility-acquired pressure ulcers, weight loss, medical errors, and infection control. Quality improvement process changes incorporating the use of pressure-redistributing mattresses have improved rates and facility-acquired pressure ulcers

  • Lumbar spine forces during manoeuvring of ceiling-based and floor-based patient transfer devices
    2009

    This article reviews an ergonomically-based study of the physica lloads placed on the lumbar spine of caregivers during the operation of floor-based and ceiling-based patient lifts. Ten subjects were studied in a biodynamic laboratory. Using biometric testing, the researchers found that the forces associated with operating a floor or ceiling mechanical lift were significantly reduced when compared to manually lifting of a patient. Further, the authors found that ceiling lifts were preferable to floor lifts due to the amount of anterior/posterior shear forces

  • 2010 AGS/BGS Clinical Practice Guideline: Prevention of Falls in Older Persons
    The American Geriatrics Society | 2010

    This multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline discusses barriers to and describes recommendations for the prevention of falls in the elderly in clinical practice

  • Best Practice for Falls Reduction: A Practical Guide
    2011

    This special supplement to American Nurse Today contains a collection of articles authored by clinicians and executives to enhance the efforts of Fall Prevention programs to create fall-safe environments

  • The three-year economic benefits of a ceiling lift intervention aimed to reduce healthcare worker injuries
    2005

    This article is a review of aresident lifting program that was implemented in an extended care facility. The facility installed ceiling lift systems for 125 beds and three tubs. A review of injury reports was conducted for a three year period prior to implementation and for three years post-implementation. Injuries were categorized according to the task being performed at the time of injury. Overall patient handling injuries decreased from 65 to 47, however lifting and transferring injury claims decreased from 30 to 10. Estimations were calculated for the cost savings from injury avoidance amounted to $1,257,605.

  • When Is It Safe to Manually Lift a Patient?
    2007

    This article describes the revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) tool for calculating the recommended weight limit for manual lifting. In general, NIOSH recommends a 35-pound limit for patient handling tasks. Assisting devices should be used when weights to be lifted exceed 35 pounds. 

  • Fall and Injury Prevention
    2008

    This chapter of the handbook presents evidence-based guidelines for falls and injury prevention in the elderly.

  • Cost-Effectiveness of a Day Hospital Falls Prevention Programme for Screened Community-Dwelling Older People at High Risk of Falls
    2010

    This study evaluated the economic impact of a multidisciplinary falls prevention program on patients aged ≥70. Falls were self-reported and collected in 12 monthly diaries. Mean falls rates were 2.07 per person/year in the intervention arm and 2.24 per person/year in the control arm. There was a mean incremental cost reduction of 3,320 GBP per fall averted. 

  • Cost effectiveness of a multifaceted program for safe patient handling
    2005

    This article reviews a study that was completed at 23 high-risk VHA units that implemented a safe patient handling program. The units served as their own historical controls by comparing post-implementation data to the previous year's same nine-month period. 537 staff members were involved in the study from 19 nursing homes and 4 spinal cord injury units. A cost-benefit analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. After taking account of the capital costs associated with the purchase of the equipment, the program resulted in an estimated cost savings of $155,719 for the nine-month period. Additionally, a statistically significant reduction in carevier injuries occurred, resulting in a decrease in lost work days and worker's compensation costs. 

  • Patient Handling and Movement Assessments: a white paper
    2010

    Commonly referred to as PHAMA, this white paper serves as a guideline for facilities on patient handling and movement. This guide also serves as a 'how-to' for facilities that are engaging in new construction or redesign. The guideline is a requirement for participants to conduct a patient handling and movement assessment in order to best design a physical space that will be conducive to patient and caregiver safety

  • Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Interprofessional National Standards, Matz, ANA, 2013
    2013

    This interprofessional national standard from the American Nurses Association reviews the need for safe patient handling and mobility for healthcare reciepients and care providers in terms of safety for all involved. It proposes eight standards that are relevant to those involved regardless of the care setting

  • Safe Lifting Practices for Nurses: Solving the Puzzle of Handling Patients with Care and Responsibility
    2008

    This series of articles describes safe lifting practices for nurses, including assessment of a patient's handling needs, and incorporation of slings and lifts to safely move patients without causing injury to nurses.

  • Delirium assessment, Bell, AACN, 2011
    2011

    This practice alert make recommendations on delirium assessment and management. These recommendations include assessing all ICU patients for delirium using validated tools and implementing strategies to decrease delirium risk fators including early exercise.

  • Safe Transfers and Movement Program Toolkit
    2012

    The Safe Transfers and Movement Program toolkit provides resources to assist you in implementing and maintaining a safe patient handling program.

  • Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pain, agitation, and delirium in adult patients in the intensive care unit, Barr J, Crit Care Med, Jan 2013
    2013

    These practice guidelines make recommendations on the management of pain, agitation, and delirium in adult patients in the ICU. The article discusses the association of delirium with increased mortality in adult ICU patients, prolonged ICU and hospital LOS, and the development of post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recommendations include performing early mobilization of adult ICU patients whenever feasible to reduce the incidence and duration of delirium

  • Safe Patient Handling Training for Schools of Nursing. Curricular Materials
    2009

    This document describes a nursing school curriculum for safe patient handling and movement in order to reduce patient injury and falls and reduce the risk for musculoskeletal injury in nurses

  • Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Interprofessional National Standards, Matz, ANA, 2013
    2013

    This interprofessional national standard from the American Nurses Association reviews the need for safe patient handling and mobility for healthcare reciepients and care providers in terms of safety for all involved. It proposes eight standards that are relevant to those involved regardless of the care setting

  • Preventing of Falls (Acute Care). Health Care Protocol
    2008

    This article describes best practices in fall prevention. Topics discussed include fall risk assessment, education to prevent falls, interdisciplinary collaboration in fall prevention, and strategies to identify patients at high risk for falls in the acute-care setting

  • Beyond Getting Started: A Resource Guide for Implementing a Safe Patient Handling Program in the Acute Care Setting
    2006

    This resource guide explains how to develop, implement and maintain a safe patient handling program in an acute care environment to reduce the risk of patient falls, skin breakdown, and injury to healthcare worker

  • Safe Transfers and Movement ™ Online Toolkit

    This toolkit is designed to be a self-guided, one-stop resource for your program needs offering a step-by-step approach with tools, industry research and information and customizable templates to support your program developmentand implementation. 

  • ICU Early physical rehab, Lord, CCM, 2013
    2013

    This articles provides a framework for financial justification of implementing an early mobility protocol in ICU's. It uses previously published cost data with measured reductions in ICU and Hospital Length of Stay to provide the financial justification. John's Hopkins saw a net cost savings of $817,836 from their investment in an early mobility protocol and technology

  • Safe Transfers and Movement™ Education Courses

    Hill-Rom supports continuing professional education to advance awareness, skills andto change behaviors of health care providers regarding the importance of safe patienthandling. Through the courses offered, your staff will gain a command of safe patient handling (SPH) principles and practical application. 

  • Progressive Mobility Program
    2013

    The evidence is in, and early mobility can help you improve your patients health as well as your hospitals bottom line. Learn how our expert clinicians can help you get your patients moving today

  • Safe Transfers and Movement ™ Program Development Workshop

    The objective of this workshop is to define and create a SPH program customized to your organization’s goals. Led by one of Hill-Rom’s Directors of SPH Programs and Services, your team will be guided through:• Create a foundation on the value of a SPH Program Plan and review theory-driven approachesto create and sustain change in your practice• Develop customized SPH policy and procedures for implementation• Develop operational processes to support your program• Create education schedules based on materials in the Safe Transfers and Movement™ Program

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention Toolkit
    2012

    This toolkit provides practical and effective strategies and tools for mitigating and preventing pressure ulcers. The toolkit includes examples of organizations who have demonstrated success in preventing and treating pressure ulcers and it’s purpose is to educate staff at other organizations to apply similar strategies and initiatives

  • Early Mobilization: Update and Physician Perspective (Video)
    Schweickert W | 2014

    In this 30min video, Dr. William Schweickert of University of Pennsylvania, details the importance of early mobility in critically ill patients and how to bridge the implementation gap.  He also summarizes findings from his recent work on the recent publication: A Survey Of International Practices And Infrastructure To Support Early Mobilization which showed that <30% of global ICU’s have a written early mobility protocol and known barriers can be overcome.  He concludes with a proposed framework for early mobilization and practical advice to get started.

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention Toolkit
    2012

    This toolkit provides practical and effective strategies and tools for mitigating and preventing pressure ulcers. The toolkit includes examples of organizations who have demonstrated success in preventing and treating pressure ulcers and it’s purpose is to educate staff at other organizations to apply similar strategies and initiatives. 

  • Microclimate Management Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
    2008

    This whitepaper explains the determination of optimal ranges for heat and moisture in order to avoid skin breakdown. 

  • Identifying Gaps, Barriers, and Solutions in Implementing Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs
    2011

    This project identified 3 major barriers to pressure ulcer prevention program implementation: limitations in staff education and training, poor communication of at-risk status, and insufficient quality improvement evaluation of bedside practices. The study noted insufficient clarity for selecting and securing appropriate therapy surfaces. Guidelines were identified for addressing these barriers. 

  • Treating Severe Pressure Ulcers in the Home Setting: Faster Healing and Lower Cost with Air Fluidized Therapy
    2004

    This article describes how AFT is technologically different from Group 1 (Static devices / mattresses) and Group 2 (dynamic powered and nonpowered mattress replacements and overlays). Using the healing rates described by Ochs, (2004) Cuddigan and Ayello model treatment costs for severe ulcers. They find a net savings of $39, 642 to heal a 49-cm2 stage III/IV ulcer when using AFT compared to Group 2 surfaces. 

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    • If you do not agree to this use, please do not accept these conditions and your Personal Information will not be stored or used by HRC.

    Personal Information has the following meaning.

    Personal Information means information which relates to an individual who can be identified from that information, whether or not in conjunction with any other information. Common examples of personal data which may be used by HRC in its day to day business include names, addresses, e-mail addresses, affiliation with commercial organizations (customers), user history & profiles of our website, telephone numbers and other contact details.

    HRC does not collect any Sensitive Personal Information, which has the following meaning:

    Sensitive Personal Information consists of data of an individual relating to the racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, physical or mental health or condition and the commission or alleged commission or any offence.

    Please do not submit this type of information.

    DATA TRANSFER

    In addition to the intended use as described above, you agree that your Personal Information may be transferred by HRC to the USA, to any country within the European Economic Area and to any country outside the USA and the European Economic Area if that that country ensures an adequate level of protection of Personal Information.  HRC has signed an agreement with HRC Inc. containing the Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCC”) as defined in the EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC). HRC business units in the United States must always follow the data privacy principles as contained in the SCC, which may be more detailed than corresponding provisions of this Policy. It is possible for Personal Information to be transferred to additional countries once it has been determined that they provide a suitable level of protection.

    HRC may share an individual’s Personal Information with Third Parties as required for normal business operations, including providing services and products to patients, health care professionals and employees.

    ONWARD TRANSFER

    When disclosing Personal Information to third parties, HRC shall only do so for the purposes identified herein. HRC shall assure that HRC’s actions align with the consent provided, in addition to any legal and/or regulatory requirements. HRC will assure and requires from these third parties, through contractual clauses and/or written agreements to adhere to a baseline of privacy and information security controls consistent with the principles laid down herein.

    If you do not agree to this transfer, please do not accept these conditions and your Personal Information will not be stored or used by HRC.

    SECURITY

    HRC takes reasonable precautions, including administrative, technical, personnel, and physical measures, to safeguard Personal Information against loss, misuse and unauthorized access, disclosure, alteration, destruction, and theft.

    LEGAL EXCEPTIONS

    Under certain limited or exceptional circumstances, HRC may, as permitted or required by applicable laws and obligations, make Personal Information available outside the scope of this policy. Examples of such circumstances include investigation of specific allegations of wrongdoing or criminal activity, protecting our employees, the public or HRC from harm or wrongdoing, cooperating with law enforcement agencies, auditing financial results or compliance activities, responding to legal requirements or process, meeting legal or insurance requirements or defending legal claims or interests, satisfying employment laws or agreements or other legal obligations, collecting debts, protecting HRC’s information assets, in emergency situations, when vital interests are at stake.

    MONITORING AND ENFORCEMENT

    HRC is committed to monitoring and enforcing ongoing compliance with this policy and with applicable privacy laws, regulations and obligations.

    Any and all potential, apparent or actual violations of this policy may be reported to HRC. HRC commits to investigate and address the issues in a diligent manner and keep the complaining party informed about the progress or outcome of an investigation.

    DELETION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

    HRC reserves the right to delete from its systems Personal Information at any time at its’ discretion.

    PRECEDENCE

    In the event of a conflict between this policy and any applicable law or regulation, the latter shall prevail.

    OPT OUT

    You may request at any time from HRC: 1) to have your Personal Information deleted and purged from our IT systems, to the extent technically possible; 2) that any further use is terminated and 3) that any Personal Information is corrected.

  • Terms of Use

    1. Scope

    1.1 The use of these internet pages provided by Hill-Rom and/or its subsidiaries ("Hill-Rom "), "Hill-Rom Web Site", is subject to these Conditions. By starting the use of the Hill-Rom Web Site these Conditions are accepted.

    2. Materials

    2.1 Hill-Rom offers on the Hill-Rom Web Site information, software or documentation (“Materials”) for purposes as designated on the web site.

    3. Access and password protection

    3.1 Hill-Rom reserves the right to a) grant, deny, limit or withdraw access rights of any user, without any notice and b) make access conditional by requiring e.g. the submission of certain information of the User and c) impose certain user conditions.

    3.2 Some Materials on the Hill-Rom Web Site may be password protected. The User shall ensure that its passwords will not be accessible by third parties and User is liable for all transactions and other activities carried out under its password.

    4. Permission and conditions of use of the Materials

    4.1 Hill-Rom grants the user a non-exclusive and non-transferable permission to use the Materials, made available to the user on the Hill-Rom Web Site for the purpose intended by Hill-Rom in making the Materials available.

    4.2 While using the Hill-Rom Web Site the User shall not:

    • Violate any (Hill-Rom) intellectual property right or any other proprietary right;

    • Upload any contents containing a virus or any other program that could damage data;

    • Transmit, store or upload hyperlinks or contents to which the User is not entitled to use, in particular in cases where such hyperlinks or contents are in breach of confidentiality obligations or are illegal; or

    • Distribute advertising, spam, unsolicited messages or incorrect warnings of viruses, defects or similar material and the User shall not solicit or request the participation in any lottery, game or any action whereby money or benefits in kind are sought.

    5. Intellectual Property

    5.1 The Materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property right laws. The Materials found on the Hill-Rom Web Site may not be changed, copied, reproduced, sold, rented, used, supplemented or otherwise used in any other way without the prior written permission of Hill-Rom.

    5.2 Except for the rights of use and other rights expressly granted herein, no other rights shall be granted to the User.

    6. Links

    6.1 The Hill-Rom Web Site may contain links to the Web pages of third parties. Hill-Rom accepts no liability for the contents of third party web pages and does not make representations about or endorse such web pages or their contents as its own, as Hill-Rom does not control or verify the content or accuracy of the information on such web pages and declines all responsibility for the contents and information given thereon. The use of such web pages shall be at the sole risk of the User and be governed by the terms use of those Web pages.

    7. Liability

    7.1 Insofar as any Materials are made available by Hill-Rom, these are provided “as is”. Any liability for defects as to quality or title of the Materials in relation to the correctness or absence of defects or the absence of claims or third party rights or in relation to completeness and/or fitness for purpose, merchantability are excluded, to maximum extent permitted by law. The required performance of a product shall be separately agreed and not be governed by the web content.

    7.2  The Materials may contain general descriptions related to the technical possibilities of individual products but these possibilities or products, may not be available to the User in certain cases, included but not limited to product changes, lacking regulatory approvals, export controls etc.

    7.3  Hill-Rom and the hosts of this web site hereby exclude any and all liability, to the maximum extent permitted by applicable law, for any claims, losses, demands or damages of any kind whatsoever with respect to Materials provided on its website including but not limited to direct, indirect, incidental or consequential loss or damages, compensatory damages or loss of profits or data, damages to IT systems and data bases, loss of data, User Data privacy breaches, whether based on a breach of contract or warranty, delict or tort (including negligence), product liability or otherwise.

    7.4. The User shall, for its own protection, be solely responsible to take the necessary steps to ensure appropriate IT and data security measures.

     8. User Data Privacy Protection & Data Transmission

    8.1  For collection, use and processing of personally identifiable data (“User Data”) of the User on the Hill-Rom Web Site, Hill-Rom shall comply with applicable laws on data privacy protection. User agrees and accepts that Hill-Rom websites may be hosted in other territories than were User is located, and User consents to User Data transmission, User Data processing and User Data controlling by Hill-Rom and its service providers anywhere in the world.

    9. Market regulations

    9.1  Each country has specific rules governing the communication of medical or other information about medical products. Nothing herein should be construed as a solicitation or promotion for any product which is not authorized by the laws and regulations of the country where the User is located. If anything on the Hill-Rom website is construed as being contrary to the laws applicable in any other country, then the Hill-Rom website is not intended to be accessed by persons from that country and any persons who are subject to such laws shall not be entitled to use the Hill-Rom website.

    10. Place of Jurisdiction, Applicable Law

    10.1 The Hill-Rom Web Site is operated and administered by companies located in multiple locations worldwide. These Conditions shall be governed by and resolved in accordance with applicable local law.

  • Privacy Policy - France

    PORTÉE ET APPLICATION

    Cette politique établit la norme concernant la collecte, l'utilisation et la protection des données personnelles. Elle concerne toute donnée personnelle collectée, conservée, traitée ou transférée de façon électronique sur ce site Web.

    Objet

    Veuillez lire attentivement cette politique, car elle définit les conditions selon lesquelles vos données personnelles seront utilisées par Hill-Rom. En cas de désaccord avec cette utilisation, n'acceptez pas les présentes conditions. Vos données personnelles ne seront alors ni conservées ni utilisées par Hill-Rom.

    Hill-Rom collecte, conserve et traite les données, y compris les données personnelles recueillies dans
    le cadre du déroulement normal de l'activité sur ce site Web. Hill-Rom utilise ces données à des fins d'analyse, de communication, de marketing et de vente. Cela peut inclure une utilisation de ces données pour vous contacter en personne, par courrier postal, par courrier électronique ou par téléphone sans que vous en ayez fait la demande. En acceptant cette politique, vous acceptez les présentes conditions. L'utilisation des données personnelles par Hill-Rom doit être cohérente avec le consentement obtenu dans les présentes conditions. Hill-Rom demandera un nouveau consentement si les données personnelles vont être utilisées à des fins autres que celles désignées dans les présentes conditions.

    • En cas de désaccord avec cette utilisation, n'acceptez pas les présentes conditions. Vos données personnelles ne seront alors ni conservées ni utilisées par Hill-Rom.

    Les données personnelles sont définies comme indiqué ci-après.

    Les données personnelles sont les données en rapport avec un individu qui peut être identifié à partir de ces données, que ce soit en conjonction ou non avec toute autre donnée. Les exemples les plus fréquents de données personnelles pouvant être utilisées par Hill-Rom dans le cadre de ses activités quotidiennes sont les noms, adresses postales, adresses électroniques, affiliations avec des organisations commerciales (clients), historiques et profils utilisateur de notre site Web, numéros de téléphone et autres informations de contact.

    Hill-Rom ne collecte aucune donnée personnelle sensible, définie comme suit :

    Les données personnelles sensibles sont les données d'un individu relatives à l'origine ethnique, aux opinions politiques, à la religion, à l'orientation sexuelle, à la santé ou condition physique ou psychologique, et à des infractions commises ou présumées.

    Veuillez ne pas fournir ce type de données.

    Transfert des données

    Outre l'usage prévu indiqué ci-avant, vous acceptez que vos données personnelles soient transférées par
    Hill-Rom aux États-Unis, à tout pays de l'Espace économique européen et à tout pays en-dehors des États-Unis et de l'Espace économique européen si ce pays assure un niveau de protection des données personnelles approprié. Hill-Rom a signé un accord avec Hill-Rom Inc. contenant les clauses contractuelles types telles que définies dans la directive de l'UE sur la protection des données (95/46/CE). Les unités opérationnelles d'Hill-Rom aux États-Unis doivent toujours se conformer aux principes de confidentialité
    des données inclus dans les clauses contractuelles types, qui peuvent être plus détaillées que les dispositions correspondantes de la présente politique. Il est possible que les données personnelles soient transférées
     à des pays supplémentaires s'il a été déterminé qu'ils fournissent un niveau de protection approprié.

    Hill-Rom peut partager les données personnelles d'un individu avec des tiers si cela est requis dans
    le cadre des activités normales, y compris la prestation de services et la fourniture de produits aux patients, aux professionnels de santé et aux employés.

    Transfert ultérieur

    La divulgation de données personnelles à des tiers par Hill-Rom doit être effectuée uniquement dans
    le cadre identifié dans les présentes conditions. Hill-Rom garantit que ses actions sont conformes
     au consentement fourni, ainsi qu'à toute exigence légale et/ou réglementaire. Hill-Rom garantit et exige de ces tiers qu'ils garantissent, par le biais de clauses contractuelles et/ou d'accords écrits, l'adhésion
    à une base de contrôles de sécurité des données et de la confidentialité cohérente avec les principes énoncés dans les présentes conditions.

    • En cas de désaccord avec ce transfert, n'acceptez pas les présentes conditions. Vos données personnelles ne seront alors ni conservées ni utilisées par Hill-Rom.

    Sécurité

    Hill-Rom prend des précautions raisonnables, y compris des mesures administratives, techniques, physiques et relatives au personnel, pour protéger les données personnelles contre la perte, l'abus
    et l'accès non autorisé, la divulgation, la modification ou la destruction sans autorisation, ainsi que le vol.

    Exceptions légales

    Dans certains cas limités ou exceptionnels, Hill-Rom peut, conformément à l'autorisation ou aux exigences de la réglementation et des obligations en vigueur, mettre les données personnelles à disposition en-dehors de la portée de la présente politique. Ces cas sont, par exemple, l'enquête sur des allégations spécifiques d'actes répréhensibles ou criminels, la protection de nos employés, du public ou d'Hill-Rom contre des actes nuisibles ou répréhensibles, la coopération avec des autorités répressives, l'audit des résultats financiers ou des activités de conformité, l'application d'exigences ou de processus légaux, la conformité aux exigences légales ou en matière d'assurance, la défense de réclamations ou d'intérêts juridiques, la conformité à la réglementation, aux accords ou à d'autres obligations légales relatives à l'emploi, le recouvrement des dettes, la protection des ressources d'information d'Hill-Rom, les situations d'urgence ou encore lorsque des intérêts vitaux sont en jeu.

    Surveillance et application

    Hill-Rom s'engage à surveiller et appliquer la conformité continue à la présente politique ainsi qu'à la réglementation et aux obligations en vigueur en matière de confidentialité.

    Toute violation potentielle, apparente ou réelle de la présente politique peut être signalée à Hill-Rom. Hill-Rom s'engage à enquêter sur les problèmes et à les résoudre avec diligence, ainsi qu'à informer régulièrement la partie plaignante des évolutions ou des résultats d'une enquête.

    Suppression des données personnelles

    Hill-Rom se réserve le droit de supprimer, à sa discrétion, les données personnelles de ses systèmes
    à tout moment.

    Préséance

    En cas de conflit entre la présente politique et toute réglementation en vigueur, cette dernière prévaut.

    Retrait

    Vous pouvez demander à tout moment à Hill-Rom : 1) d'effacer et de supprimer vos données personnelles
    de nos systèmes informatiques, dans la limite des possibilités techniques ; 2) de mettre fin à toute utilisation ultérieure de ces données et 3) de rectifier toute donnée personnelle.

  • Privacy Policy - English

    SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY

    This policy establishes the standard for collecting, using and protecting Personal Information. It covers any Personal Information that is collected, stored, processed, or transferred in electronic form on this website.

    Purpose

    Please read this policy carefully as it sets out the conditions under which your Personal Information will be used by HRC. If you do not agree to this use, please do not accept these conditions and your Personal Information will not be stored or used by HRC.

    HRC collects stores and processes information, including Personal Information in the ordinary course of business, including through this website. HRC will use this information for analytical, communication, marketing and sales purposes. This may include using these data for contacting you in person, by mail, e-mail and phone unsolicited. By accepting this policy you agree hereto. HRC’s use of Personal Information shall be consistent with consent obtained herein. HRC will obtain a new consent if Personal Information will be used for a purpose other than designated herein.

    * If you do not agree to this use, please do not accept these conditions and your Personal Information will not be stored or used by HRC.

    Personal Information has the following meaning.

    Personal Information means information which relates to an individual who can be identified from that information, whether or not in conjunction with any other information. Common examples of personal data which may be used by HRC in its day to day business include names, addresses, e-mail addresses, affiliation with commercial organizations (customers), user history & profiles of our website, telephone numbers and other contact details.

    HRC does not collect any Sensitive Personal Information, which has the following meaning:

    Sensitive Personal Information consists of data of an individual relating to the racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, physical or mental health or condition and the commission or alleged commission or any offence.

    Please do not submit this type of information.

    Data transfer

    In addition to the intended use as described above, you agree that your Personal Information may be transferred by HRC to the USA, to any country within the European Economic Area and to any country outside the USA and the European Economic Area if that that country ensures an adequate level of protection of Personal Information. HRC has signed an agreement with HRC Inc. containing the Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCC”) as defined in the EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC). HRC business units in the United States must always follow the data privacy principles as contained in the

    SCC, which may be more detailed than corresponding provisions of this Policy. It is possible for Personal Information to be transferred to additional countries once it has been determined that they provide a suitable level of protection.

    HRC may share an individual’s Personal Information with Third Parties as required for normal business operations, including providing services and products to patients, health care professionals and employees.

    Onward Transfer

    When disclosing Personal Information to third parties, HRC shall only do so for the purposes identified herein. HRC shall assure that HRC’s actions align with the consent provided, in addition to any legal and/or regulatory requirements. HRC will assure and requires from these third parties, through contractual clauses and/or written agreements to adhere to a baseline of privacy and information security controls consistent with the principles laid down herein.

    * If you do not agree to this transfer, please do not accept these conditions and your Personal Information will not be stored or used by HRC.

    Security

    HRC takes reasonable precautions, including administrative, technical, personnel, and physical measures, to safeguard Personal Information against loss, misuse and unauthorized access, disclosure, alteration, destruction, and theft.

    Legal Exceptions

    Under certain limited or exceptional circumstances, HRC may, as permitted or required by applicable laws and obligations, make Personal Information available outside the scope of this policy. Examples of such circumstances include investigation of specific allegations of wrongdoing or criminal activity, protecting our employees, the public or HRC from harm or wrongdoing, cooperating with law enforcement agencies, auditing financial results or compliance activities, responding to legal requirements or process, meeting legal or insurance requirements or defending legal claims or interests, satisfying employment laws or agreements or other legal obligations, collecting debts, protecting HRC’s information assets, in emergency situations, when vital interests are at stake.

    Monitoring and Enforcement

    HRC is committed to monitoring and enforcing ongoing compliance with this policy and with applicable privacy laws, regulations and obligations.

    Any and all potential, apparent or actual violations of this policy may be reported to HRC. HRC commits to investigate and address the issues in a diligent manner and keep the complaining party informed about the progress or outcome of an investigation.

     

    Deletion of Personal Information

    HRC reserves the right to delete from its systems Personal Information at any time at its’ discretion.

    Precedence

    In the event of a conflict between this policy and any applicable law or regulation, the latter shall prevail.

    Opt out

    You may request at any time from HRC: 1) to have your Personal Information deleted and purged from our IT systems, to the extent technically possible; 2) that any further use is terminated and 3) that any Personal Information is corrected.

  • Privacy Policy - Dutch

    WERKINGSSFEER EN TOEPASBAARHEID

    Dit beleid stelt de norm vast voor het verzamelen, gebruiken en beschermen van persoonsgegevens.  Dit heeft betrekking op alle persoonsgegevens die in elektronische vorm op deze website worden verzameld, opgeslagen, verwerkt of overgedragen.

    Doel

    Lees dit beleid aandachtig door, aangezien hierin de voorwaarden zijn vastgelegd waaronder uw persoonsgegevens door HRC worden gebruikt. Als u niet akkoord gaat met dit gebruik, dient u deze voorwaarden niet te accepteren en zullen uw persoonsgegevens niet door HRC worden opgeslagen of gebruikt.

    Gegevens, waaronder persoonsgegevens, worden door HRC tijdens de normale bedrijfsvoering verzameld, opgeslagen en verwerkt, onder meer via deze website. HRC gebruikt deze informatie voor analyses, communicatie, marketing- en verkoopdoeleinden. Dat kan inhouden dat deze gegevens worden gebruikt om persoonlijk en ongevraagd contact met u op te nemen via post, e-mail en telefoon. Wanneer u dit beleid accepteert, gaat u akkoord met de voorwaarden. Het gebruik van persoonsgegevens door HRC dient in overeenstemming te zijn met de hierin verkregen toestemming. HRC zal opnieuw toestemming vragen als persoonsgegevens worden gebruikt voor een ander dan het hierin vermelde doel.

    • Als u niet akkoord gaat met dit gebruik, dient u deze voorwaarden niet te accepteren en zullen uw persoonsgegevens niet door HRC worden opgeslagen of gebruikt.

    Met persoonsgegevens wordt het volgende bedoeld:

    De term 'persoonsgegevens' duidt op gegevens die betrekking hebben op een persoon die kan worden geïdentificeerd aan de hand van deze informatie, eventueel in samenhang met andere informatie. Veelvoorkomende voorbeelden van persoonsgegevens die door HRC tijdens haar dagelijkse activiteiten kunnen worden gebruikt, omvatten o.a. namen, adressen, e-mailadressen, samenwerking met commerciële organisaties (klanten), gebruikersgeschiedenis en profielen van onze website, telefoonnummers en andere contactgegevens.

    HRC verzamelt geen gevoelige persoonsgegevens, waarmee het volgende wordt bedoeld:

    De term 'gevoelige persoonsgegevens' duidt op gegevens van een persoon met betrekking tot de raciale of etnische afkomst, politieke opvattingen, godsdienstige overtuiging, seksuele geaardheid, lichamelijke of geestelijke gezondheid of toestand en het begaan of vermeende begaan van een strafbaar feit.

    Gelieve dit soort informatie niet te verstrekken.

    Gegevensoverdracht

    In aanvulling op het beoogd gebruik zoals hierboven beschreven, gaat u ermee akkoord dat uw persoonsgegevens door HRC kunnen worden overgedragen aan de VS, aan een land binnen de Europese Economische Ruimte en aan elk land buiten de VS en de Europese Economische Ruimte indien dat land voldoende bescherming van persoonsgegevens waarborgt.  HRC heeft een overeenkomst ondertekend met HRC Inc. waarin de modelcontractbepalingen ("SCC") zijn opgenomen zoals vastgelegd in de EU-richtlijn voor de bescherming van persoonsgegevens (95/46/EG). Business units van HRC in de Verenigde Staten dienen altijd de privacybeginselen van persoonsgegevens zoals opgenomen in de SCC op te volgen, die uitgebreider zijn dan de dienovereenkomstige bepalingen van dit beleid. Het is mogelijk dat persoonsgegevens worden overgedragen aan andere landen zodra is vastgesteld dat deze landen voldoende bescherming bieden.

    HRC mag persoonsgegevens van een individu delen met derden wanneer dat is vereist voor de normale bedrijfsactiviteiten, zoals het aanbieden van diensten en producten aan patiënten, zorgverleners en medewerkers.

    Verdere doorgifte

    HRC zal alleen persoonsgegevens aan derden verstrekken voor de hierin genoemde doeleinden. HRC ziet erop toe dat haar acties in overeenstemming zijn met de verleende toestemming, in aanvulling op wet- en regelgeving. Door middel van contractuele bepalingen en/of schriftelijke overeenkomsten ziet HRC erop toe en eist HRC van deze derden dat een basisprivacy- en -informatiebeveiliging wordt nageleefd in overeenstemming met de hierin genoemde beginselen.

    • Als u niet akkoord gaat met deze doorgifte, dient u deze voorwaarden niet te accepteren en zullen uw persoonsgegevens niet door HRC worden opgeslagen of gebruikt.

    Beveiliging

    HRC neemt redelijke voorzorgsmaatregelen, met inbegrip van administratieve, technische, personeels- en fysieke maatregelen, ter bescherming van persoonsgegevens tegen verlies, misbruik of verkeerd gebruik en ongeoorloofde toegang, openbaring, wijziging of vernietiging, en diefstal.

    Wettelijke uitzonderingen

    Onder bepaalde beperkende of uitzonderlijke omstandigheden mag HRC, zoals is toegestaan of vereist door de toepasselijke wetten en verplichtingen, persoonsgegevens beschikbaar stellen buiten de werkingssfeer van dit beleid. Voorbeelden van dergelijke omstandigheden zijn onder meer: onderzoek naar specifieke beschuldigingen van overtreding of criminele activiteit; bescherming van onze werknemers, het publiek of HRC tegen schade of overtreding; samenwerking met handhavingsinstanties; controleren van financiële resultaten of compliance-activiteiten; reageren op wettelijke verzoeken of juridische processen; voldoen aan wettelijke of verzekeringseisen of verdediging van juridische claims of belangen; naleving van arbeidswetgeving of -overeenkomsten of andere wettelijke verplichtingen; inning van schulden; bescherming van de informatiemiddelen van HRC; in noodgevallen; wanneer vitale belangen op het spel staan.

    Controle en handhaving

    HRC verplicht zich ertoe de voortdurende naleving van dit beleid en de toepasselijke privacywetgeving, voorschriften en verplichtingen te controleren en te handhaven.

    Alle potentiële, schijnbare of werkelijke schendingen van dit beleid dienen te worden gemeld aan HRC. HRC verplicht zich ertoe de kwesties op een toegewijde wijze te onderzoeken en te behandelen en de klagende partij op de hoogte te houden van de voortgang of resultaten van een onderzoek.

     

    Verwijdering van persoonsgegevens

    HRC behoudt zich het recht voor op elk gewenst moment naar eigen goeddunken persoonsgegevens uit haar systeem te verwijderen.

    Voorrang

    In geval van een conflict tussen dit beleid en toepasselijke wet- of regelgeving, heeft de laatste voorrang.

    Afmelden

    U kunt HRC op elk moment verzoeken: 1) uw persoonsgegevens uit onze systemen te verwijderen, voor zover technisch mogelijk; 2) verder gebruik te beëindigen en 3) persoonsgegevens te corrigeren.

  • Privacy Policy - German

    GELTUNGSBEREICH UND ANWENDBARKEIT

    Diese Richtlinie regelt den Standard zur Erfassung, Verwendung und Sicherung personenbezogener Informationen. Sie deckt alle personenbezogenen Informationen ab, die über diese Website erfasst, gespeichert, verarbeitet oder in elektronischer Form übertragen werden.

    Zweck

    Bitte lesen Sie diese Richtlinie sorgfältig durch, da sie die Bedingungen regelt, unter denen Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen von HRC verwendet werden. Sollten Sie mit dieser Verwendung nicht einverstanden sein, akzeptieren Sie diese Bedingungen bitte nicht. Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen werden dann von HRC weder gespeichert noch verwendet.

    HRC erfasst, speichert und verarbeitet Informationen (einschließlich personenbezogener Informationen) im Rahmen des gewöhnlichen Geschäftsverkehrs u. a. über diese Website. HRC verwendet diese Informationen für Analyse-, Kommunikations-, Marketing- und Vertriebszwecke. Hierzu kann auch gehören, Sie auf der Grundlage dieser Daten unaufgefordert persönlich per Post, E-Mail oder Telefon zu kontaktieren. Indem Sie dieser Richtlinie zustimmen, erklären Sie sich hiermit einverstanden. HRC berücksichtigt bei der Verwendung personenbezogener Informationen die hierin erteilte Einwilligung. Falls personenbezogene Informationen für einen anderen Zweck verwendet werden sollen als hierin angegeben, holt HRC vorab eine erneute Zustimmung ein.

    • Sollten Sie mit dieser Verwendung nicht einverstanden sein, akzeptieren Sie diese Bedingungen bitte nicht. Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen werden dann von HRC weder gespeichert noch verwendet.

    „Personenbezogene Informationen“ hat folgende Bedeutung:

    Personenbezogene Informationen sind Informationen zu einer Einzelperson, die anhand dieser Angaben eindeutig identifiziert werden kann, unabhängig davon, ob die personenbezogenen Informationen in Verbindung mit anderen Informationen verwendet werden oder nicht. Typische Beispiele für personenbezogene Daten, die HRC im Rahmen des täglichen Geschäftsbetriebs möglicherweise verwendet, sind Namen, Adressen, E-Mail-Adressen, Zugehörigkeit zu kommerziellen Organisationen (Kunden), Benutzerhistorie und Profile auf unserer Website, Telefonnummern und andere Kontaktangaben.

    HRC erfasst keine sensiblen personenbezogenen Informationen. Dieser Begriff ist wie folgt definiert:

    Sensible personenbezogene Informationen sind Daten zu einer Einzelperson, die sich auf deren ethnische Herkunft, politische Ansichten, religiöse Überzeugungen, sexuelle Orientierung, körperliche oder geistige Gesundheit bzw. den körperlichen oder geistigen Zustand sowie begangene oder mutmaßlich begangene Straftaten beziehen.

    Bitte geben Sie keine Informationen dieser Art an.

    Datenübertragung

    Zusätzlich zu der oben ausgeführten beabsichtigten Verwendung erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden, dass Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen von HRC in die USA, beliebige Länder innerhalb des Europäischen Wirtschaftsraums (EWR) sowie in jedes Land außerhalb der USA und des EWR übertragen werden dürfen, sofern dieses Land einen angemessenen Schutz personenbezogener Informationen gewährleistet. HRC hat ein Abkommen mit HRC Inc. unterzeichnet, das die in der EU-Datenschutzrichtlinie (95/46/EG) definierten Standardvertragsklauseln („SVK“) enthält. Alle in den USA ansässigen Geschäftsbereiche von HRC sind verpflichtet, die in den SVK geregelten Datenschutzgrundsätze jederzeit zu beachten. Diese können detaillierter sein als die entsprechenden Bestimmungen aus dieser Richtlinie. Personenbezogene Informationen können in zusätzliche Länder übertragen werden, wenn vorab festgestellt wurde, dass sie dort in geeigneter Weise geschützt werden.

    HRC kann personenbezogene Informationen zu Einzelpersonen an Dritte weitergeben, soweit dies im Rahmen des gewöhnlichen Geschäftsverkehrs erforderlich ist, etwa auch zur Bereitstellung von Dienstleistungen und Produkten für Patienten, Gesundheitspersonal und Mitarbeiter.

    Weiterübertragung

    Die Offenlegung personenbezogener Informationen gegenüber Dritten durch HRC erfolgt ausschließlich zu den hierin genannten Zwecken. HRC stellt sicher, dass die Aktionen von HRC im Rahmen der abgegebenen Einverständniserklärung sowie zuzüglich gemäß allen geltenden rechtlichen und/oder gesetzlichen Anforderungen erfolgen. HRC trägt dafür Sorge, dass bei allen Dritten bestimmte Mindestkontrollen zum Datenschutz und der Informationssicherheit durchgeführt werden, die den hierin geregelten Grundsätzen entsprechen, und verpflichtet diese Dritten zur Annahme entsprechender Vertragsklauseln und/oder der Abgabe schriftlicher Erklärungen.

    • Sollten Sie mit dieser Übertragung nicht einverstanden sein, akzeptieren Sie diese Bedingungen bitte nicht. Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen werden dann von HRC weder gespeichert noch verwendet.

    Sicherheit

    HRC trifft angemessene Vorsichtsmaßnahmen (darunter Maßnahmen administrativer, technischer, personalbezogener und physischer Natur), um die personenbezogenen Informationen vor Verlust, Missbrauch und unberechtigtem Zugriff, Offenlegung, Änderung, Vernichtung und Diebstahl zu schützen.

    Rechtliche Ausnahmen

    Unter bestimmten eingeschränkten Umständen bzw. in Ausnahmesituationen kann HRC personenbezogene Informationen auch, wie nach geltendem Recht und geltenden Verpflichtungen zulässig oder erforderlich, über den in dieser Richtlinie geregelten Umfang hinaus weitergeben. Beispiele für solche Umstände sind: Untersuchung gezielter Anschuldigungen zu Rechtsverletzungen oder kriminellen Handlungen, Schutz unserer Mitarbeiter, der Öffentlichkeit oder HRC vor Schaden oder Rechtsverletzungen, Zusammenarbeit mit Strafverfolgungsbehörden, Prüfung von Finanzergebnissen oder Compliance-Maßnahmen, Reaktion auf rechtliche oder gerichtliche Anforderungen, Erfüllung rechtlicher oder versicherungsbezogener Anforderungen oder Verteidigung von Rechtsansprüchen oder Rechtsinteressen, Erfüllung von arbeitsrechtlichen Bestimmungen oder Vereinbarungen bzw. anderen Rechtsverpflichtungen, Einzug von Schulden sowie Schutz der Informationsressourcen von HRC in Notfallsituationen, wenn zentrale Interessen auf dem Spiel stehen.

    Überwachung und Durchsetzung

    HRC verpflichtet sich zur Überwachung und Durchsetzung der kontinuierlichen Einhaltung dieser Richtlinie sowie aller geltenden Datenschutzgesetze, -bestimmungen und -verpflichtungen.

    Jeglicher potenzielle, scheinbare oder tatsächliche Verstoß gegen diese Richtlinie kann HRC gemeldet werden. HRC verpflichtet sich, entsprechende Anliegen sorgfältig zu prüfen und die beschwerdeführende Partei über den Fortschritt bzw. das Ergebnis der Untersuchung zu informieren.

     

    Vernichtung personenbezogener Informationen

    HRC behält sich das Recht vor, personenbezogene Informationen jederzeit nach eigenem Ermessen aus den eigenen Systemen zu löschen.

    Vorrang

    Bei Widersprüchen zwischen dieser Richtlinie und geltenden Gesetzen oder Bestimmungen sind letztere maßgebend.

    Opt-out

    Sie können jederzeit von HRC verlangen, 1) Ihre personenbezogenen Informationen zu vernichten und aus unseren IT-Systemen zu löschen, soweit dies technisch möglich ist, 2) jede weitere Verwendung einzustellen und 3) personenbezogene Informationen ggf. zu korrigieren.

  • Privacy Policy - Spanish

    ÁMBITO DE APLICACIÓN

    Esta política establece un marco de referencia para la recopilación, uso y protección de Información Personal. Cubre cualquier tipo de Información personal que se recoja, almacene, procese o transfiera de forma electrónica en este sitio web.

    Fin

    Lea esta política con atención, ya que establece las condiciones en las que HRC utilizará su Información personal. Si no está de acuerdo con este uso, no acepte estas condiciones y HRC no guardará ni utilizará su Información personal.

    HRC recopila, almacena y procesa la información, incluida Información personal, durante el transcurso habitual de las relaciones comerciales, incluidas las realizadas a través de este sitio web. HRC utilizará esta información con fines analíticos, de comunicación, publicidad y ventas. Estos datos podrán emplearse para contactar con usted en persona, por correo, por correo electrónico y por teléfono sin solicitud previa. Al aceptar esta política, acepta estos términos. El uso de la Información personal por parte de HRC se realizará dentro de los límites establecidos por la presente. HRC deberá obtener un nuevo consentimiento si la Información personal se utilizara para fines distintos a los aquí descritos.

    * Si no está de acuerdo con este uso, no acepte estas condiciones y HRC no guardará ni utilizará su Información personal.

    Información personal tiene el siguiente significado.

    Constituye Información personal aquella información sobre un individuo que pueda identificarlo, esté o no acompañada de otra información. Ejemplos comunes de datos personales que puede utilizar HRC en sus relaciones comerciales habituales son nombres, direcciones, direcciones de correo electrónico, afiliación a organizaciones comerciales (clientes), perfiles e historial de usuarios en nuestro sitio web, números de teléfono y otra información de contacto.

    HRC no recoge ningún tipo de Información personal delicada, que tiene el siguiente significado:

    Constituye Información personal delicada los datos pertenecientes a un individuo relacionados con su origen étnico o racial, opiniones políticas, creencias religiosas, orientación sexual, salud o enfermedad física o mental y la comisión, real o alegada, de cualquier falta o delito.

    No envíe este tipo de información.

    Transferencia de datos

    Además del uso previsto antes descrito, consiente en que HTC transfiera su Información personal a los EE. UU., a cualquier país dentro del Espacio Económico Europeo y a cualquier país fuera de los EE. UU. y del Espacio Económico Europeo si el país garantiza un nivel de protección de la Información personal adecuado. HRC ha firmado un acuerdo con HRC In. que incluye las cláusulas contractuales tipo definidas

    en la Directiva europea de protección de datos (95/46/EC). Las unidades de negocio de HRC en los EE. UU. deben seguir siempre los principios de protección de datos establecidos por las cláusulas contractuales tipo, que pueden ser más detalladas que las disposiciones correspondientes de esta Política. Es posible transferir Información personal a otros países siempre que se determine previamente su capacidad para proporcionar un nivel de protección adecuado.

    HRC podrá compartir la Información personal de un individuo con Terceros si fuese necesario para realizar operaciones comerciales, incluido el suministro de productos y servicios a pacientes, profesionales sanitarios y empleados.

    Transferencia ulterior

    La revelación de Información personal a terceros por parte de HRC está sujeta a los fines aquí descritos. HRC garantizará que sus acciones sean acordes al consentimiento prestado y cumplan los requisitos de la legislación o normativa pertinente. Es responsabilidad de HRC garantizar, mediante cláusulas contractuales o acuerdos por escrito, la adhesión de terceros a los controles de referencia establecidos para asegurar la protección de datos y la seguridad de la información de conformidad con los principios establecidos en este documento.

    * Si no está de acuerdo con esta transferencia, no acepte estas condiciones y HRC no guardará ni utilizará su Información personal.

    Seguridad

    HRC toma precauciones razonables, incluidas medidas administrativas, técnicas, personales y físicas, para proteger la Información personal frente a la pérdida, el uso indebido, el acceso no autorizado, la revelación, la alteración, la destrucción y el robo.

    Excepciones legales

    En algunas circunstancias aisladas o excepcionales, HRC podrá, en la medida en que lo permitan sus obligaciones o la legislación aplicable, divulgar Información personal fuera del ámbito de esta política. Son ejemplos de estas circunstancias la investigación de alegaciones específicas de falta o delito o de actividad criminal; la protección de nuestros empleados, el público o HRC frente a daños, delitos o faltas; la cooperación con fuerzas y cuerpos de seguridad; la auditoría de resultados financieros o actividades para el cumplimiento normativo; la respuesta a requerimientos o procesos legales; el cumplimiento de requerimientos legales o de seguros o la defensa de reclamaciones o intereses legales; el cumplimiento de leyes y acuerdos o cualesquiera otras obligaciones relativas al empleo; el cobro de deudas; la protección de información de HRC; situaciones de emergencia y si estuvieran en juego intereses vitales.

    Control y cumplimiento

    HRC se compromete a controlar y garantizar el cumplimiento de esta política de conformidad con la normativa, las leyes y las obligaciones de protección de datos aplicables.

    Cualquier violación real, potencial o aparente de esta Política deberá ponerse en conocimiento de HRC. HRC se compromete a investigar y abordar los conflictos que puedan surgir con diligencia y a mantener a la parte reclamante informada sobre el progreso o el resultado de una investigación.

     Eliminación de Información personal

    HRC se reserva el derecho a eliminar de sus sistemas la Información personal a su juicio.

    Prevalencia

    En el caso de conflicto entre esta Política y cualquier ley o normativa aplicable, prevalecerá este último.

    Abandono

    En cualquier momento, podrá solicitar a HRC: 1) la eliminación de su Información personal de nuestros sistemas informáticos, en la medida técnicamente posible; 2) que se ponga fin a cualquier uso 3) que se corrija cualquier Información personal.

  • Privacy Policy - Italian

    AMBITO E APPLICABILITÀ

    La presente Informativa definisce lo standard per l'acquisizione, l'utilizzo e la protezione delle Informazioni personali  e disciplina qualsiasi tipo di Informazione personale acquisita, salvata, elaborata o trasferita in formato elettronico su questo sito Web.

    Scopo

    Leggere attentamente la presente Informativa, poiché illustra le condizioni per l'utilizzo delle Informazioni personali da parte di HRC. Se non si è d'accordo con tale utilizzo, non accettare le condizioni. In questo modo HRC non salverà né utilizzerà le proprie Informazioni personali.

    HRC acquisisce, salva ed elabora informazioni, incluse le Informazioni personali, per svolgere le sue normali attività, anche attraverso questo sito Web. HRC utilizzerà tali informazioni per scopi di analisi, comunicazione, marketing e vendita. Le attività potrebbero includere l'utilizzo di tali dati per contattare l'utente di persona, tramite posta, e-mail e telefono, anche senza che l'utente lo abbia richiesto. Accettando la presente Informativa, l'utente accetta tale eventualità. L'utilizzo delle Informazioni personali da parte di HRC sarà sempre conforme al consenso qui riconosciuto dall'utente. Qualora le Informazioni personali vengano utilizzate per uno scopo diverso da quelli indicati nel presente documento, HRC dovrà richiedere un nuovo consenso.

    • Se non si è d'accordo con tale utilizzo, non accettare le condizioni. In questo modo HRC non salverà né utilizzerà le proprie Informazioni personali.

    Significato della locuzione Informazioni personali:

    Con la locuzione Informazioni personali si intendono le informazioni relative a una persona fisica che ne consentono l'identificazione con o senza l'utilizzo di altre informazioni. Esempi comuni di dati personali che possono essere utilizzati da HRC durante lo svolgimento della sua normale attività sono il nome, l'indirizzo, l'indirizzo e-mail, l'affiliazione a organizzazioni commerciali (clienti), la cronologia e il profilo dell'utente sul nostro sito Web, i numeri di telefono e altre informazioni di contatto.

    HRC non acquisisce Informazioni personali sensibili. Significato della locuzione Informazioni personali sensibili:

    Con la locuzione Informazioni personali sensibili si intendono i dati di una persona fisica relativi alla razza o all'etnia, alle opinioni politiche, al credo religioso, all'orientamento sessuale, alla salute o alle condizioni fisiche o mentali e a condanne penali o accuse relative a un illecito.

    Non inviare questo tipo di informazioni.

    Trasferimento dei dati

    Oltre all'utilizzo specifico indicato in precedenza, l'utente accetta che HRC possa trasferirne le Informazioni personali negli Stati Uniti, in un Paese dell'Area Economica Europea o in qualsiasi altro Paese, se tale Paese garantisce un adeguato livello di protezione delle Informazioni personali.  HRC ha siglato un accordo con HRC Inc. contenente le Clausole contrattuali standard ("CCS"), come definito nella Direttiva dell'Unione Europea relativa al trattamento dei dati personali (95/46/CE). Le business unit di HRC negli Stati Uniti d'America devono sempre seguire i principi per la riservatezza dei dati contenuti nelle CCS, che potrebbero essere più specifiche rispetto alle corrispondenti clausole della presente Informativa. È possibile che le Informazioni personali vengano trasferite anche in altri Paesi dopo che sarà stato verificato che questi Paesi offrono un livello di protezione delle Informazioni personali adeguato.

    HRC potrebbe condividere le Informazioni personali di una persona fisica con soggetti terzi per svolgere le proprie normali attività, ad esempio per fornire servizi e prodotti a pazienti, dipendenti e professionisti del settore sanitario.

    Trasferimento ulteriore

    HRC divulga le Informazioni personali a soggetti terzi solo per gli scopi indicati nel presente documento. HRC deve assicurarsi che le azioni di HRC siano conformi al consenso fornito e a qualsiasi requisito di legge e/o amministrativo. HRC garantisce e richiede a questi soggetti terzi, tramite clausole contrattuali e/o accordi scritti, di superare una serie di controlli basilari di sicurezza della privacy e dei dati secondo i principi applicabili indicati nel presente documento.

    • Qualora l'utente non accetti questo trasferimento, dovrà astenersi dall'accettare le presenti condizioni. Le Informazioni personali non saranno così salvate o utilizzate da HRC.

    Sicurezza

    HRC utilizza precauzioni ragionevoli, incluse le misure amministrative, tecniche, relative al personale e fisiche, per proteggere le Informazioni personali contro la perdita, l'utilizzo non corretto e qualsiasi accesso non autorizzato, divulgazione, modifica, distruzione e furto.

    Eccezioni consentite dalla legge

    In presenza di determinate circostanze eccezionali e limitate, HRC potrà, se consentito o richiesto dalla legge applicabile o da obblighi specifici, rendere disponibili le Informazioni personali al di fuori dell'ambito della presente Informativa. Esempi di tali circostanze sono indagini per accuse di illeciti penali o civili, protezione dei propri dipendenti, del pubblico o di HRC da minacce o illeciti, cooperazione con organi di polizia, controlli contabili o attività di conformità alle normative applicabili, risposte a richieste legali o processuali, adeguamento a requisiti legali o assicurativi o difesa di interessi o in presenza di controversie legali, adempimenti previsti da contratto o dalle normative sulle assunzioni o altri obblighi legali, recupero crediti, protezione delle informazioni di HRC, situazioni di emergenza e tutela di interessi vitali.

    Monitoraggio e applicazione

    HRC si impegna a monitorare e ad assicurare l'applicazione della presente Informativa e il rispetto degli obblighi, dei regolamenti e delle normative sulla privacy applicabili.

    È obbligatorio segnalare ad HRC qualsiasi possibile violazione, presunta o effettiva, della presente Informativa. HRC si impegna a verificare e a gestire qualsiasi problema con la massima diligenza e a tenere informate tutte le parti coinvolte sull'avanzamento o sull'esito di un'indagine.

     

    Cancellazione delle Informazioni personali

    HRC si riserva il diritto di cancellare le Informazioni personali archiviate dai propri sistemi in qualsiasi momento e a sua sola discrezione.

    Priorità

    In caso di conflitto tra la presente Informativa e qualsiasi altra normativa o regolamento applicabili, saranno questi ultimi a prevalere.

    Facoltà dell'utente

    In qualsiasi momento l'utente può richiedere ad HRC 1) di cancellare le proprie Informazioni personali dai nostri sistemi IT nella misura tecnicamente possibile; 2) di vietare qualsiasi ulteriore utilizzo delle Informazioni personali e 3) di correggere eventuali Informazioni personali errate.

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention Toolkit
    2012

    This toolkit provides practical and effective strategies and tools for mitigating and preventing pressure ulcers. The toolkit includes examples of organizations who have demonstrated success in preventing and treating pressure ulcers and it’s purpose is to educate staff at other organizations to apply similar strategies and initiatives

  • sDTI Challenges and Solutions
    2013

    During the 2013 WOCN conference held in Seattle, WA, Dr. Karen Zulkowski presented a 15 minute presentation at Hill-Rom's booth featuring the latest information on suspected Deep Tissue Injury(sDTI).  This brief presentation features an overview of the February 2013 NPUAP biennial conference dedicated to sDTI state of the science, highlights sDTI IPUP trend data, and features a published sDTI case study where patients experienced less tissue breakdown than expected on the Clinitron Air Fluidized Therapy surface.

  • Ayello, Elizabeth. REPLAY of Webinar on Advancing Safe Skin Across the Care Continuum
    2013

    REPLAY of webinar presented by Elizabeth Ayello PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA,FAAN designed to provide you with up-to-date information on best practices for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Includes latest statistics on national problem of pressure ulceres and how to address this through use of skin and risk assessments as well as the science behind surface selection

  • Ayello, Elizabeth. FILE DOWNLOAD of Webinar on Advancing Safe Skin Across the Care Continuum

    FILE DOWNLOAD of webinar presented by Elizabeth Ayello, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA, FAAN designed to provide you with up-to-date information on best practices for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Includes latest statistics on national problem of pressure ulcers and how to address this through use of skin and risk assessments as well as the science behind surface selection

  • Identifying Gaps, Barriers, and Solutions in Implementing Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs
    2011

    This project identified 3 major barriers to pressure ulcer prevention program implementation: limitations in staff education and training, poor communication of at-risk status, and insufficient quality improvement evaluation of bedside practices. The study noted insufficient clarity for selecting and securing appropriate therapy surfaces. Guidelines were identified for addressing these barriers. 

  • High Pressure Ulcer Risk Patients and Specialty Surface Utilization: Data From the 2010 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Survey
    2011

    This study evaluated current practice trends in surface utilization for patients at high risk for developing pressure ulcers. Surface types used for high-risk patients were powered static air (28%), foam (21.7%), low air loss (16%), self-adjusting technology (8%), alternating pressure (5.2%), nonpowered static air (2.0%), and air-fluidized therapy (1.8%), demonstrating that high-risk patients were most often placed on surfaces that are inferior to specialty surfaces with regard to pressure ulcer development and breakdown. 

  • Comparison of Pressure Ulcer Patients and Outcomes by Care Setting from the 2011 IPUP Survey

    This report from the International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey evaluates US care setting data from (Acute Care, LTC, LTAC, REHAB) and acute care unit types (ICU, Med Surg, Telemetry/Stepdown) for overall and facility acquired prevalence. It also evaluates risk factors such as Braden Score, Fecal and Urinary incontinence, and linen layers by care setting/unit type.

  • Overall Results from the 2011 International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey
    2012

    The 2011 IPUP survey included 104,266 patients, and demonstrated a significant decrease in Overall Prevalence (OP) beginning in 2007 and Facility Acquired Prevalence (FAP) beginning in 2008. However, at present one in ten patients has an ulcer and nearly one in 20 develop one. Acute Care and Rehab had decreased OP and FAP, while LTC remained steady and LTAC OP and FAP increased in 2011. Prevalence by Age increases dramatically after age 60. By stage, severe ulcers as a proportion of all ulcers, have remained constant, and sDTI’s are now 11% of all identified ulcers

  • Body Mass Index, Weight, and Pressure Ulcer Prevalence: An Analysis of the 2006–2007 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Surveys
    2007

    This report analyzed data from the US 2006 and 2007 IPUP surveys and revealed an overall decrease in pressure ulcer prevalence from 2004-2005 to 2006-2007 and a higher pressure ulcer prevalence in patients with low BMI and with both low and high weights; 10% of patients were extremely obese.

  • 2010 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Survey: Canadian Results
    2011

    This study collected data on pressure ulcer prevalence and risk score, surface type, and other parameters from facility-performed IPUP surveys. Overall pressure ulcer prevalence in the acute care, LTAC, LTC, and rehab settings decreased in 2009-2010. Significant decreases in facility-acquired prevalence were found in all settings except rehab.

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevalence in Bariatric Patients – Data From the International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey 2009
    2009

    This study of data from the 2009 IPUP survey focused on pressure ulcer prevalence by BMI and weight distribution revealed the following: the percentage of extremely obese patients increased from 18.3% to 20.6% in 2008-2009, 36% of survey patients have a BMI >30, and pressure ulcer prevalence is higher in patients weighing >300 lbs

  • Results of the 2008-2009 International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey and a 3-Year, Acute Care, Unit-Specific Analysis
    2009

    This observational study evaluated the prevalence of pressure ulcers in acute care facilities. In 2008 and 2009, overall prevalence was 13.5% and 12.3%, respectively. Facility-acquired prevalence was 6% and 5%, respectively. Overall prevalence was highest in long-term acute care, while facility-acquired prevalence was highest in ICUs. Overall and facility-acquired prevalence were lower in 2008-2009 compared to 2006-2007. However, in 2009 approximately 10% of all ulcers were device related. 

  • Results of the 2010 International Pressure Ulcer PrevalenceTM Survey
    2010

    This International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence (IPUP) survey of pressure ulcer prevalence revealed that overall prevalence, facility-acquired prevalence, prevalence excluding stage I, and facility-acquired prevalence excluding stage I have decreased significantly during 2009-2010. An estimated 8% to 10% of patients in ICUs developed a facility-acquired pressure ulcer. Facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence is highest in pediatric ICUs, burn units, ICU, and CCU, and SICU.

  • The Demographics of Suspected Deep Tissue Injury in the United States: An Analysis of the International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence Survey 2006-2009
    2010

    This article reports data from the international Pressure Ulcer Prevalence survey 2006-2009 in patients with suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI). Overall and facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence was constant in 2006-2008 and decreased by about 1% in 2009 (P<0.001). The prevalence of pressure ulcers identified as sDTI increased to 9% of all observed ulcers in 2009?a 3-fold increase?while the proportion of stage I and II ulcers has decreased and stage III and IV ulcers remained constant. This increase may be due in part to education of staging definitions. 

  • Early Results of an Assessment of the Incidence and Treatment of Stage II or III Pressure Ulcers of the Hill-Rom P400 Therapy Surface in Home Care and Extended Care
    2009

    This case study of 3 patients in the home care and extended care settings monitor the healing of existing pressure ulcers and the development of new pressure ulcers in patients on the P400 therapy surface. Positive results for healing were seen in all 3 patients

  • Saint Thomas Health Services (STHS): Clinical Outcomes; People, Process and Technology – Combining the Best of Each to Improve Clinical and Financial Outcomes
    2011

    This study evaluated the effects of a program converting to Hill-Rom® bed systems on the incidence of adverse events. Overall, the incidence of adverse events was reduced by the following percentages: pressure ulcers (19%), VAP (91.9%), and falls (27.7%). 

  • Air-Fluidized Therapy in Patients with Suspected Deep Tissue Injury
    2012

    In this case series, 5 patients with 10 sDTI were placed on the Clinitron® Rite Hite® AFT therapy surface within 12 hours of having the sDTI diagnosed and were also treated with standard wound care. Even with optimal treatment, sDTI wounds may rapidly progress to Stage III-IV pressure ulcers. Of the sDTIs identified: 4 healed prior to discharge, 4 evolved into stage II ulcers, and 2 remained classified as sDTI at discharge.

  • A Pilot Study of a New Low Air Loss Treatment Surface in the Critical Care Setting
    2008

    This observational study of 30 critical care patients evaluated the impact of a pressure redistribution surface with electronic sensors on existing pressure ulcers. During the study, existing pressure ulcers decreased in volume by an average of 41% and in area by an average of 9%.

  • Financial and Clinical Outcome Review of Clinitron Use to Treat Stage IV Pressure Ulcer
    2008

    This article describes a patient with a Stage IV pressure ulcer who was started on Clinitron therapy. A wound healing rate of 67% was achieved within a month of therapy and 99% after 104 days of Clinitron air-fluidized therapy. An experienced home healthcare clinician expected that a wound of this nature would take 6 months to heal. 

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention in High-Risk Postoperative Cardiovascular Patients
    2011

    Air-fluidized therapy beds were provided for patients who required vasopressors and mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours postoperatively. While on therapy beds, only 1 of 27 patients developed a stage I ulcer versus 40 ulcers developed in 25 patients prior to therapy bed implementation despite already being a high-risk population for the development of pressure ulcers due to severity of illness.

  • The Effect of Using a Low-Air-Loss Surface on the Skin Integrity of Obese Patients: Results of a Pilot Study.
    Pemberton V, et al. | Ostomy Wound Management | 2009

    This study assesses the impact of a new low-air-loss, continuous lateral rotation therapy bed in 21 obese, bariatric acute care patients. During this pilot study, pressure ulcers decreased in size from an average 5.2 cm2 to 2.6 cm2, and no new pressure ulcers developed.

  • Pressure Ulcers: Avoidable or Unavoidable? Results of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Conference
    2011

    The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) hosted a conference in 2010 to establish consensus on the avoidability of pressure ulcers. An overall 80% agreement was reached among representatives, with unanimous consensus reached for the following: most PrUs are avoidable; not all PrUs are avoidable; there are situations that render PrU development unavoidable, including hemodynamic instability that is worsened with physical movement and inability to maintain nutrition and hydration status and the presence of an advanced directive prohibiting artificial nutrition/hydration; pressure redistribution surfaces cannot replace turning and repositioning; and if enough pressure was removed from the external body the skin cannot always survive.

  • Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Progression in Critically Ill Subjects: Influence of Low Air Loss Mattress Versus a Powered Air Pressure Redistribution Mattress
    2012

    This study evaluated the change in existing pressure ulcers and incidence of new pressure ulcers in surgical ICU patients using a new low-air-loss, weight-based, microclimate management (LAL-MCM) system compared to the standard SICU bed with an integrated, powered air pressure redistribution (IP-AR) surface. Incidence of supine pressure ulcers was 0% in the LAL-MCM group and 18% in the IP-AR group (P=0.046), despite more comorbidities in the patients in the LAL-MCM group. 

  • The Effect of Using a Low-Air-Loss Surface on the Skin Integrity of Obese Patients: Results of a Pilot Study
    2009

    This study assesses the impact of a new low-air-loss, continuous lateral rotation therapy bed in 21 obese, bariatric acute care patients. During this pilot study, pressure ulcers decreased in size from an average 5.2 cm2 to 2.6 cm2, and no new pressure ulcers developed. 

  • Treating Severe Pressure Ulcers in the Home Setting: Faster Healing and Lower Cost with Air Fluidized Therapy
    2004

    This article describes how AFT is technologically different from Group 1 (Static devices / mattresses) and Group 2 (dynamic powered and nonpowered mattress replacements and overlays). Using the healing rates described by Ochs, (2004) Cuddigan and Ayello model treatment costs for severe ulcers. They find a net savings of $39, 642 to heal a 49-cm2 stage III/IV ulcer when using AFT compared to Group 2 surfaces. 

  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention in High-Risk Postoperative Cardiovascular Patients
    2011

    Air-fluidized therapy beds were provided for patients who required vasopressors and mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours postoperatively. While on therapy beds, only 1 of 27 patients developed a stage I ulcer versus 40 ulcers developed in 25 patients prior to therapy bed implementation despite already being a high-risk population for the development of pressure ulcers due to severity of illness.

  • Comparison of Air-Fluidized Therapy With Other Support Surfaces Used to Treat Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents
    2005

    This retrospective pressure ulcer prevention and treatment study compared healing rates for different support surfaces in nursing home residents. Support surface types were categorized into 3 groups: static overlays and replacement mattresses (1); low-air-loss beds, alternating pressure, and powered/nonpowered overlays/mattresses (2); and air-fluidized beds (3). Mean healing rates were as follows: 5.2 cm2/wk (Group 3); 1.8 cm2/wk (Group 2); 1.5 cm2/wk (Group 1) (P=0.007 comparing Group 3 to 1 and 2). Mean healing rates were also significantly greater for stage III/IV ulcers on Group 3 surfaces. Groups 1 and 3 had fewer hospitalizations and ER visits compared to Group 2 (P=0.01). 

  • High Pressure Ulcer Risk Patients and Specialty Surface Utilization: Data From the 2010 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Survey
    2011

    This study evaluated current practice trends in surface utilization for patients at high risk for developing pressure ulcers. Surface types used for high-risk patients were powered static air (28%), foam (21.7%), low air loss (16%), self-adjusting technology (8%), alternating pressure (5.2%), nonpowered static air (2.0%), and air-fluidized therapy (1.8%), demonstrating that high-risk patients were most often placed on surfaces that are inferior to specialty surfaces with regard to pressure ulcer development and breakdown. 

  • Identifying Gaps, Barriers, and Solutions in Implementing Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs
    2011

    This project identified 3 major barriers to pressure ulcer prevention program implementation: limitations in staff education and training, poor communication of at-risk status, and insufficient quality improvement evaluation of bedside practices. The study noted insufficient clarity for selecting and securing appropriate therapy surfaces. Guidelines were identified for addressing these barriers. 

  • The Path to Excellence: How One Facility Received and Maintained a CMS 5 Star Rating
    2010

    This whitepaper describes surveillance and documentation processes for quality measure, including facility-acquired pressure ulcers, weight loss, medical errors, and infection control. Quality improvement process changes incorporating the use of pressure-redistributing mattresses have improved rates and facility-acquired pressure ulcers

  • A Pilot Study of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Healing of Pressure Ulcers Comparing Subjects Placed on the LAL-MCM Mattress Versus a Standard Bed SICU Mattress
    2010

    This study evaluated the change in existing pressure ulcers and incidence of new pressure ulcers in surgical ICU patients using a new low-air-loss, weight-based, microclimate management (LAL-MCM) system compared to the standard SICU bed with an integrated, powered air pressure redistribution (IP-AR) surface. Incidence of supine pressure ulcers was 0% in the LAL-MCM group and 18% in the IP-AR group (P=0.046), despite more comorbidities in the patients in the LAL-MCM group.

  • Validation of an Instrument Measuring Patient Satisfaction With Chest Physiotherapy Techniques in Cystic Fibrosis
    2000

    Perceived efficacy, convenience, and comfort scores were determined from 129 surveys sent to patients with CF who used PDPV, Flutter, or HFCWO techniques. Mean satisfaction scores revealed significant improvements in perceived efficacy with HFCWO (14 patients) compared to PDPV (79 patients) (P=0.045). Patient compliance was shown to correlate with satisfaction with prescribed therapies. 

  • A Cost Analysis of High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation in Cystic Fibrosis
    1994

    This independent cost analysis investigated the impact of a high-frequency chest wall oscillation system on total health care expenditures in patients with cystic fibrosis. The study found that health care costs following the use of the system were reduced by 49%.

  • Body Mass Index, Weight, and Pressure Ulcer Prevalence: An Analysis of the 2006–2007 International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence™ Surveys
    VanGilder C, et al | Journal of Nursing Care Quality | 2009

    This report analyzed data from the US 2006 and 2007 IPUP surveys and revealed an overall decrease in pressure ulcer prevalence from 2004-2005 to 2006-2007 and a higher pressure ulcer prevalence in patients with low BMI and with both low and high weights; 10% of patients were extremely obese.